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Full text of "Rapid Population Growth Consequences And Policy Implications"

.£.£.     JV1U1UI-L.U 23. China (Taiwan)	j. j.j 12.4	1O~> 245	TV.J. 32.7	5.5	22.2	31.3	532.6	62.5	j t..j 102.1
24.  North Korea	12.1	-	38.5	10.5	-	6.2	1,099.2	-	-
25. Algeria	11.9	245	48.2	10.0	86.3	13.9	91.9	-	-
26. Peru	11.7	271	44-45	12-14	90.5	21.1	329.5	52.9	185.9
27. Ceylon	11.2	151	32.9	8.2	55.8	5.9	37.5	-	39.0
28. Tanzania3	11.2	70	46.0	24-25	190.0	1.7	19.1	-	-
29.  Nepal	10.1	99	41.1	20.8	-	1.3	1.4	-	-
30. Kenya	9.4	116	50.0	20.0	-	5.8	35.0	-	37.4
31. Portugal	9.2	439	22.9	10.3	64.9	12.4	501.8	44.6	127.0
32. Chile	8.6	576	34-36	11-12	107.1	35.5	714.2	17.6	-
33. Iraq	8.2	262	75.2	4.1	23.7	34.2	147.4	94.7	88.5
34. Malaysia^	8.0	316	36.7	7.9	50.0	10.8	264.7	73.5	41.4
35.  Ghana	7.7	314	47-52	24.0	156.0	13.0	68.2	-	73.6
36.  Cuba	7.6	-	34-36	8-9	37. 7	28.9	484.9	-	180.9
37. Uganda	7.6	92	42.0	20.0	160.0	1.9	75.8	-	26.5
- = not available.
aFor 1966 or nearest available year.
"Italicized figures in columns 1, 3, 4, and 5 are less reliable estimates, according to the sources indicated. In some cases expert readers will recognize that some nonitalicized figures are census or survey data from an earlier date which may have been questioned at the time and could certainly be out of date by 1965.
GSome data limited to Tanganyika, except columns 7 and 9.
°Data for West Malaysia.
eFor years earlier than 1965.
Sources: Col. 1 (5, Table 4); Col. 2 (6, Table 191) for 1966; Col. 3 (5, Tables 7 and 3); Col. 4 (5, Tables 17 and 3); Col. 5 (5, Tables 12 and 3); Col. 6 (7, Table 5; 8, Table 6; 5, Table 6); Col. 7 (9, Table 147) for total kwh produced; (5) for population denominators; Col. 8 (10, Supplement, Table 34; 11, Table 187); Col. 9 (8, Table 209) uses receivers and/or licenses given in this table. (5, Table 4) for population denominators.lity rates (the number of live-born infants in any given year who die before reaching their first birthday per 1,000 born alive in that same year). Infant mortality has long been considered an excellent index for comparing health levels of populations because it reflects a relatively standardized and sensitive condition and is relatively easy to measure (no population estimates are required). Even so, precisely comparable measurements have not yet been achieved even among MDC's (16). Although the degree of completeness and comparability with which live births and infant deaths are recorded in many LDC's seriously limits the reliability of the estimated infant death rate, it remains one of the best single indices of national health available. Figure 3 shows the relationship between per capita gross national products and infant mortality rates in 1965.